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Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services!

  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (1) Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (1)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (5) Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (5)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (4) Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (4)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (2) Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (2)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (1)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (5)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (4)
  • Kitten Surge Relief Program; provideing uninterrupted disease prevention, spay, and neuter services! (2)

The twice-annual surge of new baby kittens has arrived again: The warm spring months and cool autumn months of each year are when cats are restless and in heat. Although the Covid-19 outbreak has caused the announcement of a Level 3 epidemic alert, we can't expect stray dogs and cats to engage in social distancing. These animals will be giving birth not long after being in heat, and then people will be carrying litters of kittens to the animal shelter. This will lead to a "yellow light" warning of low shelter space. In order to spread the burden of caring for stray cats, the Health Inspection Office has initiated the emergency "Kitten Relief Program," in which employees in various sections temporarily provide care. This program also has the benefit of reducing the risk of infectious diseases that occurs when kittens are raised together.

The Health Inspection Office's various sections, midway homes, and the "National Chung Hsing University USR-Love in Waves" program have been working together to provide kittens obtained from applicants with warm comfortable shelter space. Apart from easing the lack of space at the animal shelter, this program also avoids the transmission of infectious disease among the animals. The simple foster care environments enable the animals to grow in peace and good health. After the completion of stay, neuter, and basic vaccination procedures, the young animals are taken back to the animal shelter, where they are posted on this Office's website among animals available for adoption.

Responding to the spread of Covid-19, although reducing the movement of personnel and vehicles in line with the government's disease-prevention policy, the Health Inspection Office has continued to engage in disease-prevention work without interruption. In addition, when not at their jobs, our colleagues have been enthusiastically serving as midway families for kittens, which has let them have the experience of being foster parents. Furthermore, frolicsome kittens have added spirit to many otherwise low-energy offices. Veterinarians spending most of their time examining, taking samples from, and vaccinating livestock are successfully tackling the challenge of raising kittens that can fit in the palms of their hands; they are washing the kittens and removing fleas, deworming them, arranging spaces where the kittens can play, and providing them with homemade toys and cardboard boxes in which they can sleep. In return, the presence of the charming, delightfully energetic kittens has had a deeply therapeutic effect.

To prevent the next surge of kittens and puppies, the Health Inspection Office appeals to the public to reduce the breeding of dogs and cats and intensify source management. People are urged to take advantage of the Kindness to Street Dog and Cat Program and the household dog and cat spay and neuter subsidy program provided by the Health Inspection Office and contracted animal hospitals. For further details, please visit the Health Inspection Office's website or call us. Spaying and neutering dogs and cats can avoid the problems caused by animals in heat, keep animals from running off and getting lost, reduce the likelihood that animals will suffer from reproductive diseases or tumors of the mammary glands, reduce male dogs' urge to mark their territory by urinating, and keep female dogs and cats from becoming pregnant and creating more stray dogs and cats. We look forward to everyone working together with us to create an animal-friendly environment.

Lastly, we remind cat owners using "litter robot" self-cleaning cat-litter boxes to read the product instructions carefully before use, and be good, knowledgeable owners.

The twice-annual surge of new baby kittens has arrived again: The warm spring months and cool autumn months of each year are when cats are restless and in heat. Although the Covid-19 outbreak has caused the announcement of a Level 3 epidemic alert, we can't expect stray dogs and cats to engage in social distancing. These animals will be giving birth not long after being in heat, and then people will be carrying litters of kittens to the animal shelter. This will lead to a "yellow light" warning of low shelter space. In order to spread the burden of caring for stray cats, the Health Inspection Office has initiated the emergency "Kitten Relief Program," in which employees in various sections temporarily provide care. This program also has the benefit of reducing the risk of infectious diseases that occurs when kittens are raised together.

The Health Inspection Office's various sections, midway homes, and the "National Chung Hsing University USR-Love in Waves" program have been working together to provide kittens obtained from applicants with warm comfortable shelter space. Apart from easing the lack of space at the animal shelter, this program also avoids the transmission of infectious disease among the animals. The simple foster care environments enable the animals to grow in peace and good health. After the completion of stay, neuter, and basic vaccination procedures, the young animals are taken back to the animal shelter, where they are posted on this Office's website among animals available for adoption.

Responding to the spread of Covid-19, although reducing the movement of personnel and vehicles in line with the government's disease-prevention policy, the Health Inspection Office has continued to engage in disease-prevention work without interruption. In addition, when not at their jobs, our colleagues have been enthusiastically serving as midway families for kittens, which has let them have the experience of being foster parents. Furthermore, frolicsome kittens have added spirit to many otherwise low-energy offices. Veterinarians spending most of their time examining, taking samples from, and vaccinating livestock are successfully tackling the challenge of raising kittens that can fit in the palms of their hands; they are washing the kittens and removing fleas, deworming them, arranging spaces where the kittens can play, and providing them with homemade toys and cardboard boxes in which they can sleep. In return, the presence of the charming, delightfully energetic kittens has had a deeply therapeutic effect.

To prevent the next surge of kittens and puppies, the Health Inspection Office appeals to the public to reduce the breeding of dogs and cats and intensify source management. People are urged to take advantage of the Kindness to Street Dog and Cat Program and the household dog and cat spay and neuter subsidy program provided by the Health Inspection Office and contracted animal hospitals. For further details, please visit the Health Inspection Office's website or call us. Spaying and neutering dogs and cats can avoid the problems caused by animals in heat, keep animals from running off and getting lost, reduce the likelihood that animals will suffer from reproductive diseases or tumors of the mammary glands, reduce male dogs' urge to mark their territory by urinating, and keep female dogs and cats from becoming pregnant and creating more stray dogs and cats. We look forward to everyone working together with us to create an animal-friendly environment.

Lastly, we remind cat owners using "litter robot" self-cleaning cat-litter boxes to read the product instructions carefully before use, and be good, knowledgeable owners.

  • Data update: 2021-07-12
  • Publish Date : 2021-07-12
  • Source: Taichung City Animal Protection and Health Inspection Office
  • Hit Count: 69